Write Resignation Letter: What to Include and Avoid (+ Free Samples)

fara nadira
Fara Nadira

Published on 9 May 2023

write resignation letter with free samples

Resigning from a job can be a difficult decision, but once it is made, it is important to handle it professionally. One of the key steps in resigning is writing a resignation letter. This letter is a formal way to inform your employer of your decision to leave and to provide them with important information about your departure.

In this blog post, we will go into more detail about what to include and avoid when writing a resignation letter. We will also provide examples to help guide you through the process so that you can resign with grace and maintain a positive relationship with your employer.

What is a Resignation Letter?

A resignation letter is an essential part of the resignation process. A resignation letter is a formal document that informs your employer of your intention to leave your job.

It is not only a professional courtesy but also an opportunity to maintain a positive relationship with your employer. It is also a way to ensure that you leave the company in a professional and respectful manner to ensure a smooth and respectful exit from the company.

When is the Best Time to Send Resignation Letter?

The best time to send a resignation letter is at least 1-2 months before your planned departure date. This gives your employer enough time to make necessary arrangements and ensures that you leave on good terms.

It is also a good idea to schedule a meeting with your manager to discuss your resignation in person, if possible. This can help to maintain a positive relationship and ensure that there are no misunderstandings about the reasons for your departure.

How Long can an Employer Keep Resignation Letter?

There is no set amount of time that an employer must keep your resignation letter on file. However, it is generally recommended that employers keep all personnel records, including resignation letters, for a certain period of time in case they are needed for legal or administrative purposes.

This period of time may vary depending on the company's policies and the applicable laws in the jurisdiction. It is always a good idea to keep a copy of your resignation letter for your own records as well.

What to Include in a Resignation Letter

When writing a resignation letter, there are a few key pieces of information that should be included:

1. Statement of Resignation

This should be the first sentence of the letter and should clearly state your intention that you are resigning from your position. It is important to keep this statement short and to the point.

2. Date of Departure

It is important to include the date on which you plan to leave the company. This will give your employer time to make necessary arrangements to fill your position. It is recommended to provide at least 1-2 month notice, but this may vary depending on your company's policies.

3. Gratitude

Expressing gratitude for the opportunities and experiences you have had while working for the company is always a good idea. This can help ensure that you leave on a positive note and maintain a good relationship with your employer. Be sincere and specific about the things you are grateful for.

4. Offer to Help with the Transition

If possible, offer to help with the transition process. This could include training your replacement or providing assistance with any outstanding projects. This shows that you are committed to leaving the company in a professional manner and that you care about its success even after you are gone.

5. Contact Information

Be sure to include your contact information so that your employer can get in touch with you if necessary. This includes your email address and phone number.

What to Avoid in a Resignation Letter

There are also a few things that should be avoided when writing a resignation letter:

1. Negativity

Avoid expressing any negative feelings or criticisms of the company or your colleagues. This can create unnecessary tension and burn bridges that may be valuable later on. Keep in mind that your resignation letter may be shared with others in the company, so it is important to maintain a professional tone throughout.

2. Too Much Detail

While it is important to provide necessary information, it is also important to keep the letter concise and to the point. Avoid including too much detail or unnecessary information. Stick to the key points and avoid going into too much detail about your reasons for leaving.

3. Unprofessional Language

Make sure to use professional language and tone throughout the letter. Avoid using slang or informal language. Remember that this is a formal letter and should be treated as such.

Format of a Resignation Letter

A resignation letter should be a formal business letter and should follow a standard format. Here is the basic format of a resignation letter:

  1. Header: Include your name and contact information, the date, and the name and contact information of your employer.
  2. Opening: Write a clear statement of your intention to resign and the date of your last day of work.
  3. Body: Provide a brief explanation of why you are resigning, an expression of gratitude for the opportunities and experiences you have had, and an offer to help with the transition process.
  4. Closing: Add your final expression of gratitude and a statement of your willingness to help with the transition process.
  5. Signature and printed name.

Examples of Resignation Letters

Here are a few examples of resignation letters to help guide you through the process:

1. Simple Resignation Letter

Dear [Manager's Name],

Please accept this letter as formal notice of my resignation from my position as [Your Position] at [Company Name]. My last day of work will be [Date of Departure].

I want to take this opportunity to express my gratitude for the opportunities and experiences I have had while working for the company. I have learned a great deal and will always be grateful for the time I spent here.

Please let me know if there is anything I can do to help with the transition process.

Sincerely,
[Your Name]

2. Resignation Letter with Offer to Help

Dear [Manager's Name],

I am writing to inform you of my resignation from my position as [Your Position] at [Company Name]. My final day of work will be [Date of Departure].

I want to take this opportunity to thank you and the rest of the team for the support and guidance you have provided me during my time here. I have learned a great deal and will always be grateful for the opportunities I have had.

Please let me know if there is anything I can do to help with the transition process. I am more than willing to assist with training my replacement or providing assistance with any outstanding projects.

Thank you for your understanding.

Sincerely,
[Your Name]

3. Resignation Letter Due to Certain Reasons

If you want to see more resignation letter with certain intentions from health, personal, new opportunity from other companies, family, or other reasons, you can download our resource by clicking Download button. Don't forget to sign up or login first before downloading.

Tips for Writing a Professional Resignation Letter

Here are some tips for writing a professional resignation letter:

  1. Keep your letter short and to the point. Avoid going into too much detail about your reasons for leaving.
  2. Express gratitude for the opportunities and experiences you have had while working for the company.
  3. If possible, offer to help with the transition process to show that you are leaving the company in a professional manner.
  4. Avoid expressing any negative feelings or criticisms of the company or your colleagues.
  5. Make sure to use professional language and tone throughout the letter.
  6. Use your own words and personalize the letter to your situation. It is essential to personalize the letter and make it specific to your situation.
  7. Make sure to proofread the letter before sending it. Check for any grammatical errors or spelling mistakes. It is also a good idea to have someone else read the letter to ensure that it is clear and concise.

Conclusion

Writing a resignation letter can be a challenging task, but it is an important step in the process of leaving a job. By including the necessary information and avoiding common pitfalls, you can ensure that your resignation is handled professionally and that you leave on good terms. Remember to keep your tone professional and positive, and be sure to offer your assistance with the transition process. With these tips and examples, you can write a resignation letter that leaves a lasting positive impression.

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